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The visual disparity of multi-platform games between the Xbox One and PS4, commonly known as Resolutiongate these days, has received a lot of media attention since the consoles launched.

There have been numerous high-profile examples (Tomb Raider: DE and AssCreed IV to name but a few) where the difference in visual fidelity has been widely publicised – but how common is this issue? Is this issue wider than the AAA games that hogged the headlines? Well, to find out, we have pulled together a comparison of the frame rate and resolution of every single multi-platform title that has seen a release on both the PS4 and Xbox One. The results? Well, see for yourself.

[table id=2 /]

The one thing that is obvious from this table is that the Xbox One has never bested the PS4 on frame rate or resolution. Another interesting aspect is that of the 29 games compared in this list, 9 of them have a higher resolution and/or frame rate on the PS4 than on the Xbox One. This means a third of the multi-platform games that have released since both consoles launched have had better visual performance on the PS4 than the Xbox One. metro-last-lightWe also know that Metro Redux, a remastered edition of the visually impressive Metro games with feature swapping, will release at 1080p60 on PS4 and 900p60 on the Xbox One. We can expect a few more of the games releasing in Q3/4 2014 to show a graphical difference between the 2 platforms.

Another interesting observation is that TT Games have managed to increase the resolution of their latest LEGO games past the 1080p barrier (and the screen is then super-sampled for screen size) where as the Xbox One versions are still locked to 1080p. I can not imagine the LEGO games being very resource hungry and the games still look lovely in 1080p but this may be a sign of things to come for multi-platform games.

Obviously, this table does not take into consideration other aspects such as texture detail, depth of field, anti-aliasing, dynamic lighting and reflections and other technical wizardry which can make a 900p game look just as impressive as a game in 1080p. Visuals can also be a subjective matter, where a game looks darker or uses a more colourful palette and appears more appealing even though it has a lower resolution.

It has yet to be shown whether DX12 or the 8% processing power increase due to Xbox Ones divorce from Kinect will have a noticeable difference in visual fidelity for the Xbox One but when a third of multi-platform games being released are more impressive on a competitors console (namely the PS4) you have to hope that Microsoft are developing as many tips and tricks as they can to give to developers to help build parity.

Of course, it would be foolish to think that Sony are resting on their laurels and the Sony ICE team are already bragging about some iimpressive texture, tiling and rendering tools that they are readying to roll out. The question is, is the increasing Xbox One performance catching the PS4 fast enough to match or surpass the increase in graphical capacity of he PS4? Only time will tell, but for the time being, the PS4 has a healthy lead.